Reykjavík Grapevine’s Tourists of the Year
This is the second year that the Reykjavik Grapevine awards the “Tourists of the Year Award" and the winner is:

In May 2013, a quartet of American tourists traveled out to Fjallsárlón, a somewhat lesser-known glacial lagoon along the Southeast coast of Iceland, and decided to have themselves a truly memorable picnic. And not just in sight of the stunning lagoon—in it. On an ice floe, to be precise, because: awesome. They were prepared for quite a feast—brought folding chairs, a table, and a cooler—but got more than they bargained for when a strong gust of wind cracked the ice away from shore and started it drifting.
Now, safe though it is to say that these intrepid travelers had maybe not thought this plan fully through, one of them nevertheless had the presence of mind to call search and rescue before losing their phone signal. They kept their composure, and waited. When the first rescue boat arrived, the picnickers had drifted a full ten meters from shore. Had there been another strong blast of wind (not unlikely in Iceland, as we know), they may have actually capsized, but luck was with them and they were rescued, perhaps a bit sheepish, but none the worse for wear.
For their blithe (and truly American) optimism, for their delightful dedication to meals al fresco, for their woeful misunderstanding of the dangers inherent in Icelandic nature, for their presence of mind when disaster struck, and for sheer ridiculousness: I nominate the Glacial Picnickers for Tourists of the Year.

Congratulations.

Reykjavík Grapevine’s Tourists of the Year

This is the second year that the Reykjavik Grapevine awards the “Tourists of the Year Award" and the winner is:

In May 2013, a quartet of American tourists traveled out to Fjallsárlón, a somewhat lesser-known glacial lagoon along the Southeast coast of Iceland, and decided to have themselves a truly memorable picnic. And not just in sight of the stunning lagoon—in it. On an ice floe, to be precise, because: awesome. They were prepared for quite a feast—brought folding chairs, a table, and a cooler—but got more than they bargained for when a strong gust of wind cracked the ice away from shore and started it drifting.

Now, safe though it is to say that these intrepid travelers had maybe not thought this plan fully through, one of them nevertheless had the presence of mind to call search and rescue before losing their phone signal. They kept their composure, and waited. When the first rescue boat arrived, the picnickers had drifted a full ten meters from shore. Had there been another strong blast of wind (not unlikely in Iceland, as we know), they may have actually capsized, but luck was with them and they were rescued, perhaps a bit sheepish, but none the worse for wear.

For their blithe (and truly American) optimism, for their delightful dedication to meals al fresco, for their woeful misunderstanding of the dangers inherent in Icelandic nature, for their presence of mind when disaster struck, and for sheer ridiculousness: I nominate the Glacial Picnickers for Tourists of the Year.

Congratulations.